Organic vs. Non-GMO labels [Infographic]

For people who have become more watchful of what goes into what they eat, the good news is that an increasing amount of food manufacturers are offering organic options, making organic food one of the fastest-growing divisions of food production in the United States. The bad news is that all of those options can be uncertain, especially when accounting for food made without GMOs, or genetically modified organisms. Some people could be trying to eat an all-organic diet, and others may simply be trying to duck GMOs. Although foods may be labeled as USDA-certified organic or Non-GMO, consumers may not understand the difference. In some cases, there is an intersection between the USDA Organic and Non-GMO labels, but there are some key differences consumers should be aware of when trying to make the distinction between organic foods and foods made without GMOs.

Typically, foods with the USDA Organic label have been manufactured without the use of GMOs as well as other standards that certify that the food has been produced with at least 95% organic ingredients. Foods that have been labeled as Non-GMO, on the other hand, only need to meet the criteria that they contain less than 1% of GMO content. Foods qualified as Non-GMO may have been exposed to fertilizers or chemical pesticides, animals may have been subjected to antibiotics or hormones, and livestock may not have been fed using 100% organic feed. In brief, all USDA Organic certified foods are Non-GMO, but not all Non-GMO certified foods are organic.

The inflated collection and choices available at the grocery store today may be more confusing, but anyone who is aware about what goes into their favorite organic chocolate brands will need to know the difference between the labeling and what the labels mean. The following infographic helps outline the differences between USDA Organic and Non-GMO labels, so review it the next time you check the labels on your favorite foods.

Check out the beneficial infographic PacMoore has produced below:

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Daily Intakes [Infographic]

Recently I read this article where it reads that –based on an updated advice by the American Heart Association– coconut oil is packed with saturated fat which can raise “bad” cholesterol and “is as unhealthy as beef dripping and butter”, say US heart experts.

This made me think it could be useful to have a very basic-quick chart with the recommended daily intakes like fats, salt, sugar and carbs.

Feel free to share it 🙂

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Ways to incorporate Coconuts into your life [Infographic]

Coconuts mainly grow near the equator in the tropical climates in parts of Asia, Africa, Latin America, and the Pacific. In the United States, you’ll find them in Hawaii and Florida. These fruits are amazing for the multitude of ways they can be consumed and used. From the husk to the milk, from your kitchen to your walls, coconuts have incredible potential.

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Food tips to improve your Mental Health [Infographic]

The evidence of food’s link to mental states has been growing.
As part of our fight against mental health, we have a very much underutilised tool – FOOD. You have the ability to improve the way you feel by controlling what you put on your plate.” – Dr Rangan Chatterjee

Here are four of the techniques that you can try at home that can help you:

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Tackling the Packaging Waste Problem [Infographic]

While food packaging has revolutionised the way we store and consume food, there is now so much of it that landfills can’t cope. Some of it is poisonous, and some of it never degrades. It can take 450 years for some types of plastic bottle to break down; one type, PET, while recyclable, doesn’t biodegrade at all.

The words Reduce Reuse Recycle have been on conscious consumers’ lips for decades; recycling is now commonplace, and there are newer initiatives like the plastic bag charge. We’d also do well to follow France’s lead in banning plastic cutlery, cups and plates. But we should create less waste to begin with. These are 5 simple ways to tackle the packaging problem yourself:

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