Eco-House Designs [Infographic]

Private homes are estimated to be responsible for about one fifth to one-fourth of global carbon dioxide emissions; and for that reason, eco-friendly construction or green building is becoming more and more of a necessity. If you’re looking to move home and are wanting something more eco-friendly, here are some alternative types of housing that will help you cut down your carbon footprint…

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The Evolution of The NYE Resolution [Infographic]

Did you know that 80% of people fail to stick to their New Year’s resolution for longer than 6 weeks? It’s no surprise really though as it can take up to 66 days to form a new habit. Some people might even give up by the second Friday in January, known as Quitters’ Day. So where exactly did the NYE resolution come from and why do people make resolutions every year?

Planning on making a resolution for 2019? Make sure you do your research, implement a plan and create a support network so your friends and family can help where they can. Will you be a resolution keeper or a resolution breaker? Apparently three of the most common reasons behind failed resolutions include setting unrealistic goals, not keeping track of progress, as well as just forgetting about the resolution altogether.

The below infographic, designed by JD Williams, outlines the lowdown of resolutions including the who, what, where, when, why and how, as well as outlining the traits of a resolution breaker vs a resolution keeper. The infographic also pinpoints the top ten resolutions from 2018, all about quitters’ day and how you can avoid becoming part of it, as well as some resolution ideas for 2019. Have you thought about going green? Volunteering? Trying Veganuary? Wearing more colour? Using less social media? After-all, the average person will spend nearly 2 hours on social media everyday (which equates to 5 years and 4 months over a lifetime).

Let us know what resolutions you’ve got planned! If you’re still thinking about a resolution, check out the below infographic and try to make your resolution specific, measurable, attainable, realistic, as well as exciting!

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Eating for Hormone Balance: How to make it Work

Your physical, mental, and emotional wellbeing depend heavily on the complex sets of hormones within your body. Acting as chemical messengers, hormones regulate numerous bodily processes and functions – including appetite, mood, and sleep, among numerous others.

In order for everything to function smoothly and for you to feel your best, your hormones need to be properly balanced, and this is where nutrition plays a vital role. Here’s what you need to pay attention to in your diet so you can improve and maintain your hormonal health.

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Greenspiration: Home Design for the Eco-Conscious

Concerns about climate changes and the general state of our planet are constantly growing. As a result, many industries have started introducing new, green approaches and methods into their business models, trying to contribute to environmental preservation. The same goes for the eco-conscious interior design which has gained popularity recently, and many owners are now implementing sustainable practices when decorating their home. In order to help you follow in their footsteps and do something good both for our environment and your family, we’ve singled out a list of some awesome ideas and suggestion regarding this topic. Feel free to take a look.
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Food Deserts in America [Infographic]

Food deserts have been a big topic in the United States lately, and for good reason: 23.5 million Americans, about 2% of all households, live in food deserts. These food deserts are defined as areas where it is impossible to find adequate fresh, whole, and healthy foods, particularly fruits and vegetables.

Most food desert areas are impoverished, and many residents of these areas do not have a car to travel to stores that carry healthy options. Not even large cities are exempt from food deserts—according to a 2009 survey, 750,000 New York residents lived in areas without adequate access to healthy food, and in 2006, 500,000 Chicago residents reported the same.

Obviously, having poor access to healthy food has health ramifications. Many people with dietary restrictions like gluten allergies or lactose intolerance have an even harder time getting proper nutrition. It is estimated that healthy eating could save $71 billion in chronic healthcare costs by lowering rates of certain diseases. In neighborhoods with access to healthy food, a 45% decrease in diabetes cases over the course of five years was noted. Obesity was also lower in these areas.

Health costs aside, there are other negative ramifications of living in a food desert. Healthy food is more expensive at smaller stores, and many people don’t have time to venture out to larger stores, even if they do have transportation. Since many people who live in these areas live in poverty, they often have no choice but to eat fast food.

The good news is that there are many different initiatives working toward fewer food deserts in the United States, including school lunch programs and bringing grocery stores to impoverished areas. Learn more from this Tulane University infographic from their School of Social Work.

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