GUEST POST: 5 Ways to take Care of your Eyes

EYES: There is so much we could say about this part of our bodies. Actually, you could write a deep sitting poem about this very important part of our bodies or even a song to praise it. I mean, what would you possibly do without your eyes?

Suppose you wake up and you could not see a damn thing. What would you do? If you are anything like me, you would be terrorized even dismayed. Long story cut short, our eyes are very important and deserve nothing but the tender most care. However, most people either knowingly or unknowingly, do not grant their eyes the care they deserve. It is this neglect that leads to a myriad of eye complications.

This is why we have compiled a list of ways to ensure your eyes are in perfect condition.

Continue reading “GUEST POST: 5 Ways to take Care of your Eyes”

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Live the Lagom Lifestyle [Infographic]

While there was no literal translation of Hygge, it generally meant a cosy lifestyle. But now there’s this Swedish lifestyle kid on the block. Meet Lagom (pronounce la, like far and gom, like Tom.) Lagom is the Goldilocks of lifestyles, and generally means, “not too much, not too little. Just right.” So, if you want to get it “just right”, follow the guide to Lagom below.

Continue reading “Live the Lagom Lifestyle [Infographic]”

Hygge Home Guide [Infographic]

Hygge is a word that’s hard to translate and you might be forgiven for thinking it’s some new hippy craze, but it’s actually been around for a while. Its appeal is spreading across the world as more countries embrace the practice.

So, what does it mean and how do you incorporate it into your life? There are lots of ways to bring this process to your being and your surroundings. The infographic below will give you all the information you need to begin your own hygge style journey to a more contented you.

Continue reading “Hygge Home Guide [Infographic]”

Having Pets Health Benefits [Infographic]

It’s not news that having an animal friend has its benefits since teaches you to be responsible for someone who is always happy to see you, who keeps you company without prejudice and even can help you being more outgoing and improves your mood. Through Happify’s infographic you’ll learn that, besides all the above, your pet affects your emotional wellbeing. Check it out below to learn how and why they make us happier:

Continue reading “Having Pets Health Benefits [Infographic]”

Top 10 Exercise Myths [Infographic]

Top 10 Exercise Myths [Infographic] | ecogreenlove

Source: WeightTraining.com

What is exercise fact vs myth? The craze surrounding exercise, weight, health, and fitness in America is a curious thing. Huge government subsidies make grains (like sugary cereals and nutritionally-empty white bread) artificially inexpensive. Fast food like McDonalds and Wendy’s is some of the cheapest commercially available food in the world.

Advertising for bad food, beer, and liquor is everywhere. However, who is always hocking this terrible food and booze? Some of the fittest, most attractive people around. People used in advertisements, if not outright fit and athletic, are at least trim and not overweight or obese.

Continue reading “Top 10 Exercise Myths [Infographic]”

Double Food – Environmental Pyramid model

The food model traditionally adopted in the Mediterranean countries (particularly in Italy, Spain, Portugal, Greece and southern France) is characterized by its nutritional balance and is in fact recognized by many food scientists as one of the absolute best for what concerns the physical well-being and prevention of chronic diseases, especially cardiovascular diseases.

This is the food model that has been considered for the construction of the nutritional part of the Double Pyramid, introduced in 2010.

Maintaining the nutritional part of the Double Pyramid and replacing the environmental one with the revision that resulted from the elaborations of this new edition, the following is the updated BCFN Double Pyramid.

The Double Pyramid for adults

Originally Published on Barrilla

A model for people’s wellbeing and protecting the environment

What is the environmental impact resulting from production, distribution, and consumption of food? To answer these questions, the Barilla Center for Food & Nutrition created the Double Food – Environmental Pyramid model, a tool that compares the nutritional aspect of foods with their environmental impact.

A unique food model created to protect the wellbeing of people and the environment

The environmental pyramid was created by studying and measuring the impact of foods already present in traditional food pyramids on the environment, and placing them along an upside down pyramid, where foods placed at the lowest level (at the peak of the triangle) have the lowest environmental impact. Placing the two pyramids next to each other, the “Double Food-Environmental Pyramid” allows people to see seen that the foods that area advised to be eaten more, are also, generally, those that have the lowest environmental impacts. On the other hand, foods that are advised to be eaten less are also those that have a greater environmental impact.

The Double Pyramid for growing children

For the construction of the Double Pyramid “for those who are growing”, the same approach was employed as the one used to achieve the “adult” version by placing alongside the usual environmental pyramids, the food ones that had been made by taking into account the nutritional needs of children and adolescents. When considering children, or more generally, people who are still growing (up to 20 years of age), certain foods take on a different importance. The guidelines of the USDA – United States Department of Agriculture (one of the references considered), suggest a different distribution of sources of protein – especially meat – than that of adults, without affecting the mode of reading the double pyramid: foods with the lowest environmental impact are the ones most recommended for consumption.

Summary of macro-guidelines for healthy growth

  • Adopt a healthy and balanced diet that daily alternates all the main foods that supply all the nutrients and micro-nutrients (calcium, iron, vitamins, etc.) that children and adolescents need.
  • Avoid excessive intake of calories by consuming high-calorie or high-fat foods.
  • Divide up the intake of nutrients during the day in a balanced way, ensuring that there is a balance between animal and vegetable proteins, simple and complex sugars (by eating less sweets and more bread, potatoes, pasta or rice), vegetable and animal fats (using less lard and butter and more olive oil).
  • Reduce the intake of salt to a minimum in order to reduce additional risk factors for developing hypertension, especially in adulthood.
  • Distribute food intake over five times in the day: breakfast, morning snack, lunch, snack and dinner.
  • Avoid eating food outside the five times previously identified.
  • Engage in physical activity for at least an hour a day, including that of both sports and just playing.
  • Minimize a sedentary lifestyle as much as possible, particularly the time spent in front of a video screen (television and computers).

GOOD FOR YOU, SUSTAINABLE FOR THE PLANET

Source:
Barilla website

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Practical Ways to Feel Happy

25 Science-Backed Ways to Feel Happier

Originally Published as 25 Science-Backed Ways to Feel Happier on Greatist.com

Even as children, we’re taught to recognize and celebrate feelings of happiness—and it’s no wonder. Not only is happiness one of the most positive emotions we can experience, but being happy is also the key to a fulfilled, healthy life. Plus, cheeriness is linked to living longer, how hard we work, physical function as we age, and an improved immune system, among other health benefits.

While it’s hard to define (especially since it varies from person to person), some experts describe happiness as “a combination of life satisfaction and having more positive emotions than negative emotions,” while others view it as consisting of three parts: feeling good, living a “good life,” and feeling part of a larger purpose. There’s also a distinct difference between short- and long-term happiness: The former is a fleeting feeling, while the latter applies to how we describe our own lives.

While some factors that affect happiness might be outside of our control (such as genetics or certain life circumstances), there are always actions we can take to amp up our own good feelings. To smile wider, be more satisfied with life, and feel altogether better—both in the present and the future—try introducing any (or all!) of these practices into your life. Continue reading “Practical Ways to Feel Happy”