Gardening for Climate Change [Visual]

Have you noticed that spring is coming earlier, that plants are blooming at odd times, or that rains are more intense? If so, it’s likely you’re witnessing the first stages of climate change – and how we plan and manage our gardens will have to change. More and more scientists agree that we’re locked into a global temperature increase of 2 degrees Celsius, which is a number we’re told we can’t cross in order to maintain our planet’s equilibrium.

Your garden can make a significant difference in the fight against climate change. We can use trees, shrubs, and vines to shade our homes and reduce energy use while sequestering carbon from the air. The plants we choose can be composed largely of natives, which are genetically hardwired to tackle local weather extremes. And lawn-reducing planting beds that are thick and lush, just like we’d see in nature, make added contributions to minimizing carbon footprints while providing essential habitat for diverse wildlife.

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How different States’ Commutes affect our Climate (USA) [Infographic]

It’s no secret carpooling is good for the environment, but in major cities where life moves quickly, it’s not always possible. People keep different schedules, work on opposite sides of town, or simply prefer to commute alone. The emerging popularity of electric vehicles has helped to alleviate the burden of vehicular carbon dioxide emissions, but are people making the shift to lower their carbon footprint when they can’t carpool?

The states in which commuters most commonly drive alone to work are some of the states with the fewest electric vehicles. This combination leads to a substantial carbon footprint. Below is a breakdown of the states creating the biggest impacts — both positive and negative — on the environment.

With gas-powered cars and trucks accounting for one-fifth of America’s total carbon dioxide emissions, a small change, such as driving with a coworker, working remotely more often, or switching to a hybrid or electric vehicle, can contribute to a major change! Read on to see where each state stands.

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Ways to Reduce your Carbon Footprint [Visual]

In October 2018, the world’s leading scientists, led by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, issued a “final call” on climate change, stating that the world is completely “off track”.

To avert long-term and irreversible harm to our climate will require “rapid, far-reaching and unprecedented changes in all aspects of society”.

According to the report, the world has around 12 years remaining to enact these changes if we want to keep temperature increases to 1.5°. Currently, the world is on course for a worrying rise of 3° by 2030.

While government pressure on big businesses is ratcheting up, what can you and other citizens do to reduce the carbon emissions being released into the world around us?

Below is a guide with some things you can do to cut your carbon footprint:

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Rising Sea Levels [Infographic]

As global temperatures rise, sea levels have also begun to climb, resulting in disastrous flooding that has devastated and displaced communities around the world. Unfortunately, sea levels will only grow higher in the coming years—temperature increases are likely to continue due to climate change and will rapidly melt glaciers. In this likely scenario, it won’t just be a few people underwater—sea levels could negatively affect more than 100 million people, equaling about one-third of the US population. Sea levels are expected to rise 8-34 inches by 2100, and flooding could make current coastal areas uninhabitable within the next century.

For more information about how sea levels could displace millions and cost the global economy trillions, check out this infographic from the Safety Management Program at Eastern Kentucky University Online.

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The Eco Guide to Bike-Sharing

We are tearing this planet apart – there’s too many of us, we’re practically walking (or, should we say, driving) pollution and the cause of global warming. Well, we’re trying to make up for it and make an everyday life a little bit more sustainable. One of the ways to do that is to share, but there is a question of a pretty bipolar economic and social impact of this strategy. Apparently, carbon emission is a less problem than the question who’s paying for the gas and who gets a free ride. It doesn’t mean that we don’t care about the planet, but we simply care much more about ourselves. That can be seen in the case of one of the most eco-friendly parts of sharing economy – the bike-sharing. Although the most eco-friendly places in the world (Denmark, Germany, Netherlands) have more than 70% cyclist out of the entire population, many countries still think that bike sharing services are important. Maybe the main reason for this lies in the fact that we are not sure about the size of the impact that bike sharing has on a climate change. Well, let’s take a look what every turn of the pedal brings.

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