Easy-to-Grow Indoor Plants That Thrive [Infographic]

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Growing plants indoors can be beneficial to both body and mind. Normal plant processes include absorbing CO2 and releasing moisture into the air. Physically, both of these functions can be beneficial in a stuffy office environment. Humans breathe in air, absorb O2, and exhale CO2, while plants will do the opposite – absorbing the CO2 and releasing O2. This exchange makes having plants around seem like a logical idea. One study, published in the Journal of Environmental Psychology, studied possible benefits of indoor plants, finding that indoor office plants could prevent fatigue during attention-demanding work. Plants can actually make us smarter!

Now, this sounds good in theory, but how does one go about getting their office or home filled with plants in an easy way? You’re at the right place! This infographic shows you which plants are worthy of your selection, along with some informative notes on care. Pothos, Spider Plant, English Ivy, Rubber Tree, Dumb Cane, Fiddleleaf Fig, Heart-Leaf Philodendron, Snake Plant, Jade plant, Cast Iron Plant, Peace Lily, and Ponytail Palm are the gems listed below.

Whichever you choose, you should ensure you adhere to some important best practices when it comes to caring for house plants. The most important of these are not over-watering your plant, and pruning your plant to keep the foliage even.

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Ten Mistakes New Herb Gardeners Make (and How to Avoid Them!)

Originally from The Skinny Gourmet

Image from The Skinny Gourmet

So you’re thinking of herb gardening, or maybe you tried it last year and it was an utter disaster? Have no fear. There are a few simple mistakes that many herb newbies make (and I know, because I made most of ’em myself). Master these simple and practical tips for herb gardening and you’ll be using your own fresh herbs like Mario Batali in no time.

Fresh herbs are one of the greatest ways to increase the taste of your food healthfully. I often toss whatever leafy herbs are hand liberally into a salad to add unexpected variations in flavor (basil, oregano and dill are all great choices). Fresh herbs can add punch to sauces or create intensely flavorful crusts for roasted meats. While fresh herbs are now regularly available at grocery stores year round, growing your own herbs is a great way to build mastery over your food. Growing herbs at home can be easy whether you live in a house in the suburbs or an apartment in the city.

Let it be known that I have the blackest of thumbs. I routinely kill houseplants and whether from too much love or too much neglect I never really know. Moreover, I live in a condo in Chicago, so I only have pots on my back fire escape as my city “garden.” In fact, I’ll argue that it is my black thumb that gives me the bona fides to give beginner gardeners tips, because I have figured out how to grow herbs and am painfully aware of every lesson I learned along the way.

It surprises me how often I bump into friends who are flummoxed about some aspect of herb gardening. And strangely, I feel there are few practical guides to growing herbs on the internet for someone just starting out. Most of the advice is geared towards high end gardeners who can make sense of soil PH and whatnot. When I was starting out, what I really needed was some sort of herb gardening for dummies. So here is my quick and practical advice for growing herbs for beginners.  Continue reading “Ten Mistakes New Herb Gardeners Make (and How to Avoid Them!)”

What can I Plant in March? [Infographic]

Check out some of the tasty stuff you can start planting right now.

Continue reading “What can I Plant in March? [Infographic]”

Growing Cilantro, a Kitchen Garden Essential

Cilantro Varieties    |    Growing Cilantro in Containers

Original on Organic Gardening

Many people aren’t aware that cliantro seeds are also called coriander. Whatever you call it, this cool-weather annual has pale mauve flowers that bees and other pollinators just love.

Continue reading “Growing Cilantro, a Kitchen Garden Essential”