Pet Caring Health Benefits [Infographic]

Pet Caring Health Benefits [Infographic] | ecogreenloveby Quakertown Veterinary Clinic via Visual.ly

Who says exercise can’t be fun? Playing with pets is a great way to stay active and burn calories! Take a look at this Quakertown vet clinic infographic to see the many other health benefits of owning pets.

It is Health the real Wealth | ecogreenlove

Easy-to-Grow Indoor Plants That Thrive [Infographic]

Brought to you by Fix.com

Growing plants indoors can be beneficial to both body and mind. Normal plant processes include absorbing CO2 and releasing moisture into the air. Physically, both of these functions can be beneficial in a stuffy office environment. Humans breathe in air, absorb O2, and exhale CO2, while plants will do the opposite – absorbing the CO2 and releasing O2. This exchange makes having plants around seem like a logical idea. One study, published in the Journal of Environmental Psychology, studied possible benefits of indoor plants, finding that indoor office plants could prevent fatigue during attention-demanding work. Plants can actually make us smarter!

Now, this sounds good in theory, but how does one go about getting their office or home filled with plants in an easy way? You’re at the right place! This infographic shows you which plants are worthy of your selection, along with some informative notes on care. Pothos, Spider Plant, English Ivy, Rubber Tree, Dumb Cane, Fiddleleaf Fig, Heart-Leaf Philodendron, Snake Plant, Jade plant, Cast Iron Plant, Peace Lily, and Ponytail Palm are the gems listed below.

Whichever you choose, you should ensure you adhere to some important best practices when it comes to caring for house plants. The most important of these are not over-watering your plant, and pruning your plant to keep the foliage even.

Facts about Fruit Drinks [Infographic]

Found on How Stuff Works and originally published on HealthScience.net
as Soda’s Evil Twin: The Dangers of “Fruit Drinks”

According to info gathered by HealthScience.net, fruit drinks are not only not “healthy” but they are in many cases actually worse for you than soft drinks and sodas. Higher in sugar and much higher in calories. And even though some (but not all) contain real fruit juice, they are probably responsible for more expanding waistlines than those donuts you gave up eating during the morning sales briefing. (Considering an 8-ounce serving of Snapple Apple has more sugar than 2 and a half Krispy Kreme glazed donuts, you were probably off reaching for the box rather than the bottle.)

— ERIC ROGELL on Discovery.com

Double Food – Environmental Pyramid model

The food model traditionally adopted in the Mediterranean countries (particularly in Italy, Spain, Portugal, Greece and southern France) is characterized by its nutritional balance and is in fact recognized by many food scientists as one of the absolute best for what concerns the physical well-being and prevention of chronic diseases, especially cardiovascular diseases.

This is the food model that has been considered for the construction of the nutritional part of the Double Pyramid, introduced in 2010.

Maintaining the nutritional part of the Double Pyramid and replacing the environmental one with the revision that resulted from the elaborations of this new edition, the following is the updated BCFN Double Pyramid.

The Double Pyramid for adults

Originally Published on Barrilla

A model for people’s wellbeing and protecting the environment

What is the environmental impact resulting from production, distribution, and consumption of food? To answer these questions, the Barilla Center for Food & Nutrition created the Double Food – Environmental Pyramid model, a tool that compares the nutritional aspect of foods with their environmental impact.

A unique food model created to protect the wellbeing of people and the environment

The environmental pyramid was created by studying and measuring the impact of foods already present in traditional food pyramids on the environment, and placing them along an upside down pyramid, where foods placed at the lowest level (at the peak of the triangle) have the lowest environmental impact. Placing the two pyramids next to each other, the “Double Food-Environmental Pyramid” allows people to see seen that the foods that area advised to be eaten more, are also, generally, those that have the lowest environmental impacts. On the other hand, foods that are advised to be eaten less are also those that have a greater environmental impact.

The Double Pyramid for growing children

For the construction of the Double Pyramid “for those who are growing”, the same approach was employed as the one used to achieve the “adult” version by placing alongside the usual environmental pyramids, the food ones that had been made by taking into account the nutritional needs of children and adolescents. When considering children, or more generally, people who are still growing (up to 20 years of age), certain foods take on a different importance. The guidelines of the USDA – United States Department of Agriculture (one of the references considered), suggest a different distribution of sources of protein – especially meat – than that of adults, without affecting the mode of reading the double pyramid: foods with the lowest environmental impact are the ones most recommended for consumption.

Summary of macro-guidelines for healthy growth

  • Adopt a healthy and balanced diet that daily alternates all the main foods that supply all the nutrients and micro-nutrients (calcium, iron, vitamins, etc.) that children and adolescents need.
  • Avoid excessive intake of calories by consuming high-calorie or high-fat foods.
  • Divide up the intake of nutrients during the day in a balanced way, ensuring that there is a balance between animal and vegetable proteins, simple and complex sugars (by eating less sweets and more bread, potatoes, pasta or rice), vegetable and animal fats (using less lard and butter and more olive oil).
  • Reduce the intake of salt to a minimum in order to reduce additional risk factors for developing hypertension, especially in adulthood.
  • Distribute food intake over five times in the day: breakfast, morning snack, lunch, snack and dinner.
  • Avoid eating food outside the five times previously identified.
  • Engage in physical activity for at least an hour a day, including that of both sports and just playing.
  • Minimize a sedentary lifestyle as much as possible, particularly the time spent in front of a video screen (television and computers).

GOOD FOR YOU, SUSTAINABLE FOR THE PLANET

Source:
Barilla website

Be Eco: Join the Green and Share the Love!

E-Waste on the Rise [Infographic]

Brought to you by Custom Made

Last year, the world produced nearly 54 million tons of electrical and electronic products, but only a fraction of it was reused, refurbished, or recycled. With a relatively short lifecycle, e-waste now litters dumpsites all over the world, exposing humans and the environment to toxic materials.

Some eco-conscious offices use industrial desks made mostly from recycled materials, while a number of homeowners have turned to reclaimed barnwood to create sustainable desks and entertainment centres. However, despite any sustainable intentions, there’s no stopping the constant influx of new and improved technology. In a world where a single year renders a cellphone obsolete, electronic waste is a big and growing problem.