Banning Plastic Water Bottles [Infographics]

You may not think twice about picking up a plastic water bottle at the airport or a concert venue and then tossing it in the recycling bin whenever you finish hydrating. After all, plastic water bottles are easy to use and accessible—you can find them pretty much anywhere you go.

But all this convenience comes at a major price for the environment on which we all rely. Single-use plastics (such as plastic water bottles) add to our landfills, pollute our oceans, and cause untold devastation to wildlife and the environment as a whole. What’s more, plastic water bottle production contributes to climate change.

The good news? There’s a straightforward solution to the plastic water bottle conundrum. We simply need to use less of them. Plastic water bottle bans in cities, states, and entire countries have made major strides, as well as people converting to reusable bottles.

Take a closer look at plastic water bottle use around the world plus why it’s so important to ban the bottle.

Plastic Water Bottle usage [Infographic] | ecogreenlove
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<img title="Plastic Water Bottle usage [Infographic] | ecogreenlove" src="https://www.waterlogicaustralia.com.au/media/shared/images/blog/plastic-water-bottle-usage-across-the-globe.png" alt="Plastic Water Bottle usage [Infographic] | ecogreenlove" width="960" height="3956" /> Visual <a href="https://www.waterlogicaustralia.com.au/blog/banning-the-plastic-water-bottle-and-bottled-water-culture/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">source</a>
The Impact of Bottled Water on the Environment [Infographic] | ecogreenlove
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<img title="The Impact of Bottled Water on the Environment [Infographic] | ecogreenlove" src="https://www.waterlogicaustralia.com.au/media/shared/images/blog/plastic-waste-what-if-nothing-is-done.png" alt="The Impact of Bottled Water on the Environment [Infographic] | ecogreenlove" width="960" height="4689" /> Visual <a href="https://www.waterlogicaustralia.com.au/blog/banning-the-plastic-water-bottle-and-bottled-water-culture/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">source</a>
Plastic Ban [Infographic] | ecogreenlove
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<img title="Plastic Ban [Infographic] | ecogreenlove" src="https://www.waterlogicaustralia.com.au/media/shared/images/blog/what-impact-does-banning-plastic-bags-have-on-the-environment.png" alt="Plastic Ban [Infographic] | ecogreenlove" width="960" height="2068" /> Visual <a href="https://www.waterlogicaustralia.com.au/blog/banning-the-plastic-water-bottle-and-bottled-water-culture/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">source</a>

What are the innovations for alternative water bottles?

Plastic water bottles are not the only means to obtain water and stay hydrated. There are a variety of alternative water bottles, which include:

  • Reusable water bottles
    Reusable water bottles are made from several different materials, including ceramic, glass, and stainless steel. These materials offer a number of benefits over plastic. For instance, all of these materials will last for years, and glass can be recycled an infinite number of times.
  • Edible water bottles
    If that sounds crazy, check out an invention called Ooho, which Fast Company described as “a blob-like water container.” The product contains water in a double membrane.
  • Biodegradable water bottles
    Even bottles that aren’t edible may be biodegradable. Take the water bottle maker Cove, which has produced a 100-percent biodegradable water bottle and a label made with non-toxic inks and glue. The bottles can be composted and will theoretically break down even if they end up in a landfill or ocean (though it’s unclear how long that process will take).
  • Boxed water
    Paper bottles still draw on environmental resources (after all, paper comes from trees), but they are 100-percent recyclable and may be less toxic than plastic bottles.

Paper bottles still draw on environmental resources (after all, paper comes from trees), but they are 100-percent recyclable and may be less toxic than plastic bottles. Scientists are also experimenting with plastic alternatives derived from the likes of mushrooms or sugar combined with carbon dioxide.

Conclusion

Make no bones about it, plastic water bottles wreak havoc on ecosystems around the globe. But whenever possible, people can choose not to use plastic water bottles and opt for reusable options instead. In the process, we can all play a part in saving our planet.

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