How deep do we need to go for Oil [Infographic]

Over the years, companies have had to go further and further into the earth in order to find Earth’s remaining oil and today we are deeper than ever.

In this piece, we’ll be looking at the Z-44 Chayvo Well, the deepest on the planet, and show you comparisons so you can see clearly just how amazing this feat is. It also shows you the depth of this well in comparison to the earth’s core. How close does this drill actually get? And finally, outlines just how much it costs to pull off the deepest ever oil extraction.

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Green Documentaries: Island Earth

Island Earth is a documentary film that tells the story of a young indigenous scientist’s journey in Hawaii, through the corn fields of GMO companies and loi patches of traditional elders, reveals modern truths and ancient values that can save our food future.

More info: Island Earth: Documentary examines how the world’s population can be fed without destroying the planet
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Green Documentaries: Inuit Knowledge and Climate Change

Nunavut-based director Zacharias Kunuk and researcher and filmmaker Dr. Ian Mauro have teamed up with Inuit communities to document their knowledge and experience regarding climate change. This documentary, the world’s first Inuktitut language film on the topic, takes the viewer “on the land” with elders and hunters to explore the social and ecological impacts of a warming Arctic.

This unforgettable film helps us to appreciate Inuit culture and expertise regarding environmental change and indigenous ways of adapting to it. Exploring centuries of Inuit knowledge, allowing the viewer to learn about climate change first-hand from Arctic residents themselves, the film portrays Inuit as experts regarding their land and wildlife and makes it clear that climate change is a human rights issue affecting this ingenious Indigenous culture.

Hear stories about Arctic melting and how Inuit believe that human and animal intelligence are key to adaptability and survival in a warming world.

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Simple guide to Composting [Infographic]

Originally published on mbg

Composting organic waste is one of the best things you can do for the environment.

What is compost, anyway?

Nicknamed “Black Gold” by many gardeners and farmers, compost is a soil-like substance made from decomposed organic materials, such as yard trimmings and food scraps. When used properly, beneficial microorganisms in your compost pile will break down the waste until it becomes an unrecognizable substance that is dark, fluffy and rich in nutrients. It can be used for potting plants, as a form of mulch, or as a “soil amendment” that increases the organic content of your soil.
The barrier to entry might seem high, but composting is as easy as you want to make it.

Not only does composting divert organic materials from landfills, it also creates a nutrient-rich material perfect for growing a wide variety of plants and crops. The barrier to entry might seem high, but composting is as easy as you want to make it. This guide will help you get started:
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Green Paper [Infographic]

Breathe in, breathe out. You have just utilized the benefit of one tree. Trees are an environmental miracle – they convert carbon dioxide into oxygen, forests are homes to 80% of the world’s terrestrial biodiversity, and as a physical resource, they are used for products like chairs, building materials, and paper.

In the last decade alone, the tech boom has changed our ways of living and communicating, and has also added a heavy load onto the environment. Making electronics requires a lot of energy, nonrenewable materials like plastic and metals, and comes at the cost of harming the environment through using fossil fuels and emitting greenhouse gases, which contribute to global warming. In comparison, how is paper production and use any safer?

Paper encourages more tree planting, is less harsh on the environment, and uses significantly less renewable energy resources. Check out this infographic “Green Paper: Why Paper is Surprisingly Eco-Friendly” to learn more about the benefits of using paper!

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Amazon Dash: more Plastic and Consumption

Amazon Dash: does the world really need more little pieces of plastic?
Excerpt from the full original article by Senay Boztas on Guardian Circular Economy

Amazon Dash: does the world really need more little pieces of plastic? | Photograph: Amazon
Image by Amazon via Guardian

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Smarter and Greener: The Future of Building [Infographic]

The future of construction could involve swarms of robots and 3D printed houses. Microalgae could help buildings generate energy and provide shade. Futuristic insulating materials could lower energy needs for buildings.

This is an exciting time to be in construction. The challenges of a growing world population and increased economic development across the world are putting an increased strain on our resources and the environment. This challenge is being met across the globe by engineers who are developing new methods of construction and perfecting materials to improve lives and help the environment.

Some of these breakthroughs are still very much in the research and development phase, while others are already starting to be used in ground-breaking projects.

Robot swarm construction methods are being developed at Harvard and could have huge implications on construction in the future. The idea for robot swarm construction actually comes from how termites are able to build their elaborate termite mounds. The beauty of swarm construction is that, rather than having different robots with specific instructions, each member of the robot swarm can combine to finish a project. In theory, this means that, should a few robots breakdown, the project should be able to be completed with minimal disruption.

The 3D printing is a little further along the line, and has even been tested in China, where the company ‘WinSun’ have built houses using this method, and by DUS architects in the Netherlands. As with robot swarm construction this method could be used, in the far future, to build on the moon and possibly even planets.

It is not just building methods that are being developed; considerable research has gone into utilising new materials. These include Microalgae, (which provides shade while producing renewable energy), Aerogel Insulation (which is as light as air and has super-insulating properties) and the ultra-strong transparent aluminium.

In the infographic below we learn more about these materials and methods and also look at some buildings that are showing the way. These include the world famous Edge Building in Amsterdam and the Crystal in London.

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