Happiness [Animation]

The story of a rodent’s unrelenting quest for happiness and fulfilment.
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Buying Vegetables Guide [Infographic]

If you are unable to tell which tomatoes are ripe or if that lettuce is fresh, the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) has a helpful guide on how to select vegetables at the supermarket that LifeHacker has put it in an easy-to-scan, printable infographic format to save it on your phone or print it out and take it to the store, and you’ll always have the freshest veggies. Check it out below.

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Upcycling 101: Thrift Shopping

Rare finds like vintage armoires and antique dressers are among the best pieces of furniture to repurpose, collect, or display in your home. But even ordinary used furniture and housewares can be transformed into unique and functional pieces! Collecting and repurposing furniture and household items is all the rage right now. Images of refurbished and made-over salvaged pieces can be seen splattered all over Pinterest and Facebook. This trend is known as “upcycling.” Continue reading “Upcycling 101: Thrift Shopping”

The Most and Least eco-friendly shopping Bags [Infographic]

When doing the grocery we always tend to think is better to buy paper bags or carrying our own fabric reusable bag, right? Well, our friends from MyTree.tv shared these stats which show how even paper bags leave a big water footprint and reusable cotton bags may not be the best ecofriendly option either. Check the full article here and tell us what you think!

Paper vs. plastic bags: You’d think this fight would have been settled by now. But as Trace explains, for cities around the world, the fight is more complicated than you’d think.

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A Guide to Food Waste [Infographic]

A Guide to Food Waste [Infographic] | ecogreenlove

Brough to you by Fix.com

In 2010, around one-third of the food produced in the United States was not consumed, and ended up being wasted. That is a troubling statistic, and represents a food waste crisis that if left ignored will continue to burn holes in the pockets of families, and contribute to waste and the myriad problems it causes our planet.

One of the first things you can do to cut food waste in your home is to stop treating the “best-before,” “use-by,” and “sell-by” labels as gospel that determine when food must instantly been thrown out. These labels are used for shelving and inventory purposes in stores, and you should always trust your eyes and nose before you trust a number on a package. Consider using food rather than throwing it out, unless your senses tell you otherwise!

Make your meal plans and take stock of what you have in your fridge and pantry before you go shopping, and shop accordingly. Consider joining a CSA to take advantage of freshness, and buy your groceries a few times a week and when needed, rather than all at once.