The Problem with Consumerism [Videos]

In 2009, South Korea did something remarkable. The country poured 2% of its GDP, some $38.1 billion, into environmental projects, hoping to create one million green jobs over the next  five years. The goal was to spur growth in a slumping economy while simultaneously creating a low carbon society. In one sense, the plan worked. South Korea’s economic system did eventually recover, but in a more important sense, the plan failed. From 2009 to 2014, Korea’s emissions rose 11.8%. So, despite massive investments in clean energy, railway expansion, and energy efficiency, South Korea’s emissions still climbed.

So what happened? Why didn’t South Korea’s green growth strategy work? The video below (by Our Changing Climate) will answer that question and more in order to understand one of the insidious spectres that haunts the green energy revolution: consumption.

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A Learning Curve Opportunity

Many are panicking about the Covid-19, in the supermarkets are empty shelves of toilet paper, rice and hand-gel. Yesterday while scrolling on the ecogreenlove IG feed, we found an amazing post by the illustrator Emily Ehlers (mostly known as Eco with Em, follow her if you haven’t already!). She illustrated what she called “A Radical reframing of Covid-19“. It gave us a different perspective and we want to share it with you:

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When to Repair, Replace or Recycle your Appliance [Video + Infographic]

The concept of throwaway culture belongs in the waste bin of history. No longer is it necessary to toss out every washer, A/C, vacuum, fridge, and other household appliance and electronic device. This guide is designed to help you decide whether to repair, discard, or replace those broken machines in your life, and which avenues to pursue when you make those choices.

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Remember The Wonder Years?

I’m currently re-watching “The Wonder Years” during my crafty moments and I’ve come across many lessons and also memories. Somehow is one of those undervalued series that could, among some of those from the 90s, make a come-back. Now, it makes more sense wince I’m watching the series as an adult, back then it was just the cute guy Kevin and wondering if he would end up with Winnie, but now it has a deeper meaning. It triggers my own family memories and invites to me reflect on how things used to be before internet, smartphones and being aware of consumerism and plastic pollution.
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