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What to do with my used face mask?

DIY Patterns & How to Dispose of Facemasks | ecogreenlove

Walking around in our city, we’re already used to see some garbage on the ground, e.g. cigarette butts, lost packages of paper tissues and discarded bags from some fast food meals. But recently, there’s a new addition: single-use face masks.

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Green Documentaries: Terra Blight [Trailer Video]

produced by: Jellyfish Smack Productions

Terra Blight traces the life cycle of computers from creation to disposal and juxtaposes the disparate worlds that have computers as their center. From a 13-year-old Ghanaian who smashes obsolete monitors to salvage copper to a 3,000-person video game party in Texas, Terra Blight examines the unseen realities of one of the most ubiquitous toxic wastes on our planet.

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The Truth about Styrofoam [Infographic]

The Truth about Styrofoam [Infographic] | ecogreenlove

“It might keep your coffee hot without burning your hand, but plastic foam – more commonly known as Styrofoam – is one of the most harmful materials around when it comes to the environment. This petroleum-based plastic has gained a lot of negative attention in recent years, prompting bans in many cities such as New York City and Washington D.C.”

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Is Chewing Gum harmful to the Environment? [Infographic]

Brought to you by Custom Made

A Sticky Problem

Whether it’s being used as a mid-day breath refresher or on the playground to see who can blow the biggest bubble—chewing gum is a daily habit for many people. But what happens when you’re done chewing it? 80–90% of chewing gum is not disposed of properly and it’s the second most common form of litter after cigarette butts.

Chewing gum is made from polymers which are synthetic plastics that do not biodegrade. When it’s tossed on the sidewalk, there it sits until it’s removed which can be a costly, time consuming process. Littered gum can also make it’s way into the food chain. It has been found in fish where it can accumulate toxins over time. Sustainable chewing gums have been produced. These gums are natural, biodegradable substances. Cities are also implementing gum receptacles to cut down on waste. In a six month period these trash cans cut down on littered gum by 72%.

Next time you get ready to toss your gum, consider aiming for a trash can instead of the side walk.