Why should you Care about Pollinators [Infographic]

Bees and other pollinators, such as butterflies, bats and hummingbirds, are increasingly under threat from human activities.

Pollinators allow many plants, including many food crops, to reproduce. Not only do pollinators contribute directly to food security, but they are key to conserving biodiversity – a cornerstone of the Sustainable Development Goals. They also serve as sentinels for emergent environmental risks, signaling the health of local ecosystems.

Invasive insects, pesticides, land-use change and monocropping practices may reduce available nutrients and pose threats to bee colonies.

To raise awareness of the importance of pollinators, the threats they face and their contribution to sustainable development, the UN designated 20 May as World Bee Day.

Continue reading “Why should you Care about Pollinators [Infographic]”

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Conservation Friendly Construction [Infographic]

It’s becoming increasingly clear that we need to adapt our construction methods to be more environmentally friendly. However, this isn’t just a case of green energy and sustainable materials, plans must also account for the local ecosystem.

The construction of both residential and commercial properties is encroaching further and further into our countryside. As a result, wildlife habitats are negatively affected and the UK’s biodiversity suffers.

In addition, changing animal behaviours in urban areas are being caused by a range of human factors. These include air and light pollution as well as habitat loss and fragmentation amongst others.

As towns and cities take over more green space, we’re increasingly likely to encounter wildlife or even share our home with them. A surprisingly common example of this is bats roosting in and around homes.

Thankfully, there are solutions being developed which will allow us to coexist peacefully with our indigenous animal species. Read on to find out what issues exist and how conservation-friendly construction can remedy them…

Continue reading “Conservation Friendly Construction [Infographic]”

Environmental Dates: International Day for Biodiversity

The United Nations has proclaimed May 22 The International Day for Biological Diversity (IDB) to increase understanding and awareness of biodiversity issues.

When first created by the Second Committee of the UN General Assembly in late 1993, 29 December (the date of entry into force of the Convention of Biological Diversity), was designated The International Day for Biological Diversity. In December 2000, the UN General Assembly adopted 22 May as IDB, to commemorate the adoption of the text of the Convention on 22 May 1992 by the Nairobi Final Act of the Conference for the Adoption of the Agreed Text of the Convention on Biological Diversity. This was partly done because it was difficult for many countries to plan and carry out suitable celebrations for the date of 29 December, given the number of holidays that coincide around that time of year.

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Where food begins [Infographic]

Where food begins [Infographic] | ecogreenlove

by FAO
(Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations)

Healthy soils are critical for global food production, but we are not paying enough attention to this important “silent ally,” FAO Director-General José Graziano da Silva said on the eve of World Soil Day, to be celebrated on 5 December.

Healthy soils not only are the foundation for food, fuel, fibre and medical products, but also are essential to our ecosystems,  playing a key role in the carbon cycle, storing and filtering water, and improving resilience to floods and droughts, he noted.

The UN has declared 2015 the International Year of Soils. Help raise awareness and promote more sustainable use of this critical resource. Related links: http://www.fao.org/soils-2015/en/

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Environmental Dates: International Day for Biological Diversity

The United Nations has proclaimed May 22 The International Day for Biological Diversity (IDB) to increase understanding and awareness of biodiversity issues. When first created by the Second Committee of the UN General Assembly in late 1993, 29 December (the date of entry into force of the Convention of Biological Diversity), was designated The International Day for Biological Diversity. In December 2000, the UN General Assembly adopted 22 May as IDB, to commemorate the adoption of the text of the Convention on 22 May 1992 by the Nairobi Final Act of the Conference for the Adoption of the Agreed Text of the Convention on Biological Diversity. This was partly done because it was difficult for many countries to plan and carry out suitable celebrations for the date of 29 December, given the number of holidays that coincide around that time of year.

This year’s theme reflects the importance of efforts made at all levels to establish a set of Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) as part of the United Nations Post-2015 Development Agenda for the period of 2015-2030 and the relevance of biodiversity for the achievement of sustainable development.The selection of the theme also underlines the adoption of the Gangwon Declaration, by ministers and participants to the High-level Segment of the twelfth meeting of the Conference of the Parties to the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD). The Gangwon Declaration welcomed the importance given to biodiversity in the outcome document of the Open Working Group on Sustainable Development Goals and called for the further integration and mainstreaming of biodiversity in the Post-2015 Development Agenda.

Source: Convention of Biological Diversity

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