A Guide to Chia seeds [Infographic]

A Guide to Chia seeds [Infographic] | ecogreenlovevia northstarnutritionals.com

Chia is packed with the healthy fats doctors and nutritionists recommend for our diets – Omega 3s, Omega 6s and Omega 9s. These are the same fats found in fish and nuts that are heart healthy and good for us. They help keep our bad cholesterol levels low, and our good cholesterol levels high.

And you don’t need huge amounts. A single scoop provides fiber, protein, and calcium. That single scoop even provides 51 mg of magnesium, which is good for muscle health, nerve health, heart health…too many benefits to begin to list! But just in case you’re interested, this article explains the many benefits of chia in great detail.

Is Chia New?

Not at all. It’s believed the Aztecs used chia seeds centuries ago. And modern research into their health properties started over 20 years ago.

Guide to growing and using Herbs [Infographic]

Originally Published by Health Perch

Learning More About These Flavorful Ingredients

It’s about thyme you considered growing an herb garden. Herbs are easy to grow and can be incorporated into almost any dish for a flavorful kick.

Heading to a party? Why not bring a dip with some fresh grown chives. Getting ready to grill some meat? Try rubbing it with thyme, first. Knowing what herbs go with what food can be tricky. This infographic will teach you which herbs to use when you cook, what their flavor is so you can try some experimenting and their proper growing conditions.

 

Growing Epazote

Image by Forest & Kim Starr

Epazote is a piece of living history. Native to Central and South America, this herb was prized by the Aztec culture for culinary and medicinal uses. Today epazote has naturalized in the United States along roadsides (frequently called a weed) and is known to grow in New York’s Central Park. Some call epazote a weed, while others enjoy it as a culinary companion to cooked beans. If you’re the latter, try growing epazote plants in your garden.

Epazote adds a distinct flavor to Mexican dishes and is a staple ingredient in bean dishes, both for its taste and its anti-flatulent properties. Like cilantro, epazote has a fragrance and flavor that folks either love or hate. Leaves have an aroma that seems to smell differently to different people. It’s been described as having tones of lemon, petroleum, savory, gasoline, mint, turpentine, and even putty. Despite the sometimes odd fragrance, the unique flavor makes epazote an ingredient that can’t be duplicated or replaced in recipes.

Pregnant or nursing women should not consume epazote in any form. No one should ingest the seeds or oil, which are poisonous. It’s also wise to avoid consuming the flowering tips of stems.

Note: While we do not currently carry this variety, we offer this information for gardeners who wish to grow it.

Extract originally published on bonnieplants.com. Please click the link for more specific information about soil, planting, care and harvesting.

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All about Peppercorns: Types & Tips

Called the “king of spices”, pepper has a long history of being used as a seasoning, a preservative, and even currency. By far the most frequently used spice, pepper adds an excellent depth of flavor to nearly any savory dish, and many sweet dishes as well.

Black, white, and green peppercorns all come from the same vine. They grow in clusters (like grapes), and are harvested in various stages of growth.

Continue reading “All about Peppercorns: Types & Tips”

New Uses for Old Things in the Bathroom

ecogreenlove_newUsesOldThingsBathroom

Originally published by Real Simple

Fresh new spins on bathroom essentials:

Toothbrush | Soap | Cotton balls | Shower curtain | Toilet paper tube/roll |
Hair dryer | Conditioner | Baby oil | Dental floss | Flat iron |
Cotton swab | Epsom salt | Hair spray | Lip balm | Nail polish/remover |
Petroleum jellyRubbing alcohol | Comb | Toothpaste | Others

Continue reading “New Uses for Old Things in the Bathroom”