How Electrifying your Home can Help the Environment [Infographic]

The “electrify everything” movement aims to use cleaner energy and decrease our dependence on fossil fuels. Many people have already switched their gas-powered cars to electric ones for a smaller carbon footprint. Now homeowners are looking to convert any technology or appliance in their home that runs on natural gas to electric power. To learn more about why homeowners are electrifying their homes, explore the infographic below from The Zebra.

There’s nearly an even split in the U.S. between houses that run on electricity or natural gas, and some use a combination of both. While electricity production currently isn’t 100% clean, many local governments are introducing electricity options where you can buy electricity from renewable sources. There’s still a long way to go before the electric grid is completely clean but proponents for electrification say that you shouldn’t wait for a full transformation.

It’s important to remember that the best way to help the environment is by consuming less energy — no matter what source it comes from.

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Battery Powered Future Cars [Infographic]

The last few years have seen electric cars go from being something niche to being genuine challengers to traditional combustion engine vehicles. This piece looks how that will continue into the future, as electric cars are predicted to surpass sales of 400 million vehicles by 2040. By this point they are also predicted to account for over a third of all new car sales.

A key aspect of this is the falling price of the battery, which is expected to have dropped in price by four fifths by 2030. A key driver in this is the take up of electric sales in China, which is expected to be by far and away the largest market for new sales of electric cars by 2040.

The dominating figure in the sales of luxury electric vehicles is, of course, Tesla. But other major car makers have taken note of their success and are following suite. Looking beyond the i series of BMWs, this infographic has included some of the most exciting Tesla killers that should hit the market in the coming years. This includes the secretive Faraday Future, a Chinese backed American start up that has already received $1 billion of investment.

The auto manufacturing market could be further disrupted by big players from outside of the sector. Google and Apple are the most obvious challengers, but Chinese search Giant Baidu and the innovators at Dyson in the UK are also sizing up the electric car market as one area of expansion.

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Electric vs Hydrogen: The battle to fuel the future of cars [Infographic]

The best and brightest minds in the automotive world are going head to head to decide how you will power your car in the future. Will the car you drive run on hydrogen (as championed by Toyota) or will it be powered by a battery, possibly made by the market leading Tesla?

The aim of both is to provide the world with cars that run as well as traditionally fuelled models, while reducing the carbon footprint of the automotive industry as a whole. Both hydrogen and battery electric vehicles currently produce zero emissions, but that does not necessarily tell the whole story as the energy they run on has to be produced somehow.

Proponents of hydrogen point to how ubiquitous the element is and how much more power a hydrogen fuel stack can produce when compared to a battery. They will also point out how limited battery technology currently is and how this is a limiting factor in the performance of battery electric vehicles.

Fans of electric cars will retort by saying how much more mature, and green, the infrastructure for electric cars is when compared to hydrogen powered vehicles.

If you are still trying to decide which fuel will be dominating the future of driving, then why not read this infographic to find out the facts about both?

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