Organic vs. Non-GMO labels [Infographic]

For people who have become more watchful of what goes into what they eat, the good news is that an increasing amount of food manufacturers are offering organic options, making organic food one of the fastest-growing divisions of food production in the United States. The bad news is that all of those options can be uncertain, especially when accounting for food made without GMOs, or genetically modified organisms. Some people could be trying to eat an all-organic diet, and others may simply be trying to duck GMOs. Although foods may be labeled as USDA-certified organic or Non-GMO, consumers may not understand the difference. In some cases, there is an intersection between the USDA Organic and Non-GMO labels, but there are some key differences consumers should be aware of when trying to make the distinction between organic foods and foods made without GMOs.

Typically, foods with the USDA Organic label have been manufactured without the use of GMOs as well as other standards that certify that the food has been produced with at least 95% organic ingredients. Foods that have been labeled as Non-GMO, on the other hand, only need to meet the criteria that they contain less than 1% of GMO content. Foods qualified as Non-GMO may have been exposed to fertilizers or chemical pesticides, animals may have been subjected to antibiotics or hormones, and livestock may not have been fed using 100% organic feed. In brief, all USDA Organic certified foods are Non-GMO, but not all Non-GMO certified foods are organic.

The inflated collection and choices available at the grocery store today may be more confusing, but anyone who is aware about what goes into their favorite organic chocolate brands will need to know the difference between the labeling and what the labels mean. The following infographic helps outline the differences between USDA Organic and Non-GMO labels, so review it the next time you check the labels on your favorite foods.

Check out the beneficial infographic PacMoore has produced below:

Continue reading “Organic vs. Non-GMO labels [Infographic]”

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How To Eat If You’re Avoiding GMOs [Infographic]

How To Eat If You’re Avoiding GMOs [Infographic] | ecogreenlove
Infographic by Whole Foods

Knowledge is Power. Please share this Infographic:

<a href="http://www.wholefoodsmarket.com/sites/default/files/media/Global/WFM_GMO_Infographic_2.pdf" target="_blank"><img class="wp-image-2071 size-full" title="How To Eat If You’re Avoiding GMOs [Infographic] | ecogreenlove" src="https://ecogreenlove.files.wordpress.com/2014/03/wfm_gmo_infographic_2.png" alt="How To Eat If You’re Avoiding GMOs [Infographic] | ecogreenlove" width="699" height="2550" /></a> Infographic by <a href="http://wholefoodsmarket.com/gmo" target="_blank">Whole Foods</a>

11 Ways To Shop if Avoiding GMOs

  1. Go organic!
  2. Look for the Non-GMO Project Verified seal
    Third-party verification that a product is made without the intentional use of GMO ingredients.
  3. Choose 365 Everyday Value® brand Food Products
    All plant-derived ingredients in food products are sourced to avoid GMOs. (Note: If a product has meat, eggs or dairy ingredients, they could be from animals that were given GMO feed — unless the product is organic or Non-GMO Project Verified.)
  4. Be Informed
    Currently, these are the only US crops grown commercially from GMO seed: alfalfa, canola, corn, cotton, Hawaiian papaya, soy, sugar beets, yellow summer “crook-neck” squash and zucchini.
  5. Eat Your Fruits and Veggies
    Most fresh produce is non-GMO; sweet corn, Hawaiian papaya, edamame, zucchini and yellow summer squash are the only produce items currently grown commercially from GMO seed*. We are working to provide verified non-GMO versions of these in our produce departments.
  6. Consider the Additives
    The five most prevalent GMO crops of corn, canola, soy, cotton and sugar beets end up as additives in all kinds of packaged foods as corn syrup, oil, sugar, flavoring agents, thickeners and other additives. Over 70% of packaged food products in North America contain GMOs. Choose organic or Non-GMO Project Verified.
  7. Check the Source on Meat, Eggs and Dairy
    Milk, cheese, eggs, beef, chicken and pork could all be from animals that were fed GMO feed. Choose organic or Non-GMO Project Verified.
  8. Go Wild
    Some farmed fish eat GMO feed. Choose wild-caught seafood or farmed oysters, mussels and clams (they aren’t given supplemental feed).
  9. Feel Good About Frozen
    Most frozen fruits and vegetables are non-GMO. Frozen fruits and vegetables without additives are good non-GMO choices unless from one of these five high-risk crops: sweet corn, Hawaiian papaya, edamame, zucchini and yellow summer squash. Choose organic or Non-GMO Project Verified for those five.
  10. Go for Dry Grains, Beans, Nuts and Seeds
    As long as you avoid corn and soy, choosing dry beans, grains, nuts and seeds is a great way to go non-GMO.
  11. Drink Responsibly
    All wine and beer labeled either “organic” or “made with organic” or “Non-GMO Project Verified” must use non-GMO yeast. Wine grapes and the grains used to make beer are not typically GMO.

*Some GMO versions of apples and other crops are being tested but are not currently approved to be planted for commercial production. GMO versions of tomatoes and potatoes have been approved for planting, but are not currently in commercial production.

Source via Whole Foods Market

You have the right to know what’s in your food!

Eat Good, Feel Good! | ecogreenlove

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