The World’s Most Traffic Congested Cities [Interactive Storymap]

This interactive StoryMap that Southside Motor Factors has put together, highlights 10 of the Most Traffic Congested Cities:

https://s3.amazonaws.com/uploads.knightlab.com/storymapjs/825e414589fbde4ae96feb0ea111979b/the-worlds-10-most-traffic-congested-cities/index.html

If you don’t see the interactive StoryMap please click the image below or go to this link

The World’s Most Traffic Congested Cities [Interactive Storymap] | ecogreenlove
Interactive StoryMap by Southside Motor Factors

Do you live in one of these congested cities?
Share your experiences with us 🙂

Be Eco: Join the Green, Share the Love! | ecogreenlove

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All about Poinsettias [Infographics]

via Home Depot

Things you probably didn’t know about where poinsettias came from and how they ended up in your home this holiday: Continue reading “All about Poinsettias [Infographics]”

[VIDEO] Experiments in small space gardening in Mexico City

In the ruins of an old storage building, young urban farmers in Mexico City’s Roma District are experimenting with how to grow efficiently, and easily, in a small space. They share their experiments in square foot gardening, DIY vertical gardens, permaculture, herb spirals, hydroponics, rainwater catchment, and vermicomposting.

Read the story on Fair Companies and follow on Facebook | Twitter
Follow Huerto Romita on Facebook | Twitter

look deep into nature, you'll understand everything | ecogreenlove

Recipe: Mexican Day of the Dead Bread (Pan de Muerto)

pan_de_muerto_ecogreenloveWatch the Original Recipe here

Mexican Pan de Muerto, It’s a bread made from butter and eggs, scented with orange and azahar water.

Feliz Dia de Muertos!

Continue reading “Recipe: Mexican Day of the Dead Bread (Pan de Muerto)”

Growing Epazote

Image by Forest & Kim Starr

Epazote is a piece of living history. Native to Central and South America, this herb was prized by the Aztec culture for culinary and medicinal uses. Today epazote has naturalized in the United States along roadsides (frequently called a weed) and is known to grow in New York’s Central Park. Some call epazote a weed, while others enjoy it as a culinary companion to cooked beans. If you’re the latter, try growing epazote plants in your garden.

Epazote adds a distinct flavor to Mexican dishes and is a staple ingredient in bean dishes, both for its taste and its anti-flatulent properties. Like cilantro, epazote has a fragrance and flavor that folks either love or hate. Leaves have an aroma that seems to smell differently to different people. It’s been described as having tones of lemon, petroleum, savory, gasoline, mint, turpentine, and even putty. Despite the sometimes odd fragrance, the unique flavor makes epazote an ingredient that can’t be duplicated or replaced in recipes.

Pregnant or nursing women should not consume epazote in any form. No one should ingest the seeds or oil, which are poisonous. It’s also wise to avoid consuming the flowering tips of stems.

Note: While we do not currently carry this variety, we offer this information for gardeners who wish to grow it.

Extract originally published on bonnieplants.com. Please click the link for more specific information about soil, planting, care and harvesting.

Continue reading “Growing Epazote”