Cooking with Matcha [Infographic]

Matcha is made from the leaves of the Camellia sinensis plant, the same plant used to make all green and black teas. To create matcha, farmers grow tea plants in special shaded conditions, pick the finest young buds, and use a slow-turning granite grinder to rub them into an ultra-fine, vivid jade-hued powder. Matcha powder is whisked into warm water to make traditional matcha tea, frothed with milk to make green-tea lattes, and used to flavor and color various foods.

Green tea is sometimes called the healthiest beverage on the planet. Matcha tea boasts even more nutrients than brewed green tea because it contains the actual tea leaves (rather than just liquid flavored by steeping leaves). In fact, tea made from matcha powder has 137 times more of the potent antioxidant epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) than brewed green tea, according to one study. Intrigued? Dig into more of the health benefits of matcha and discover 10 delicious and healthy recipes with matcha in the starring role.

Continue reading “Cooking with Matcha [Infographic]”

Advertisements

Benefits of Matcha [Infographics]

via Visual.ly

Matcha (抹茶, pronounced [mat.tɕa]) is finely milled or fine powder green tea. The Japanese tea ceremony centers on the preparation, serving, and drinking of matcha. In modern times, matcha has also come to be used to flavour and dye foods such as mochi and soba noodles, green tea ice cream and a variety of wagashi (Japanese confectionery). Matcha is a fine-ground, powdered, high-quality green tea and not the same as konacha.

Blends of matcha are given poetic names called chamei (“tea names”) either by the producing plantation, shop or creator of the blend, or by the grand master of a particular tea tradition. When a blend is named by the grand master of a tea ceremony lineage, it becomes known as the master’s konomi, or favoured blend.

Continue reading “Benefits of Matcha [Infographics]”