Bizarre Ingredients Hidden in Your Food Labels [Infographic]

Bizarre Ingredients Hidden in Your Food Labels [Infographic] | ecogreenloveby Food Packaging Labels

Packaged foods usually contain labels that tell consumers what is inside a food product. Since they provide information which helps you plan your diet regime according to your needs and habits, food labels are a very important part of the meal planning process.

As the saying goes, you are what you eat. These days people pay great attention to what they are eating. That’s why you will often see parents, youngsters and elders standing in front of the supermarket shelves, carefully reading labels of the products they are planning to buy.

While reading the labels of your favorite beverages, sugary foods or anything else you like to eat, you’ll often come across additives, extracts, acids and other substances with weird names or words in Latin that you don’t recognize. Although you will learn a lot from the basic elements that a food label contains, sometimes the ingredients list includes words and ingredients whose origin and meaning you can’t even guess. Most people will not do any serious research to find out what every single ingredient really is, but this can be tricky in cases when you need to avoid a certain product because of an allergy or food intolerance, for instance. But even if you are not allergic to any type of food, there are reasons why you really want to know the exact contents of your meal.

Here is an infographic that will open your eyes about the food industry and help you make the best choice for your diet. However, it might scare you a little, because it reveals the secrets of 14 peculiar ingredients that are hidden in food labels. You will be surprised by how many of your best-loved food products contain ingredients with the weirdest origin.

Learn more on Food Packaging Labels

eat good, feel good | ecogreenlove

Advertisements

Vegan Milk Substitutes [Infographic]

MilkSubstitutions_ecogreenlove

“As the vegan diet becomes more popular, more people are looking for milk substitutes. In fact, many of the people I know who drink almond milk or enjoy substituting coconut milk into baking aren’t even vegans. They’re people with lactose intolerance or people who enjoy eating healthy real foods.

I always warn people when they try a milk replacement to keep in mind that they have different flavors than cow’s milk. It can be disconcerting to try something and assume its flavor and texture is going to mimic the milk you’ve been drinking for 20 years, but if you think of it as an entirely different drink, the first sip should be very enjoyable.

Because there are now so many options for nondairy milks, it can actually get pretty confusing. If you became a vegan in the 1980s or 1990s, your only option was really soy milk, with the occasional rice milk indulgence. Now there are many different brands for dozens of nut milks, bean milks, and even grain milks. “

– Cathleen Woods from vegan-nutritionista.com

What milk do you drink? Which one do you commonly use for baking?

Be Eco: Join the Green and Share the Love!