Edible Plants to Grow Indoors [Infographic]

The idea of growing an indoor farm, full of healthy food you can spoil yourself with over summer may sound too good to be true. But with a little love and care, whether you live in a house or a flat, you can grow a variety of fresh veg, fruit and even edible flowers ready for your next dinner party – guaranteed to impress.

But the benefits don’t stop there, growing your own greenery will give the satisfaction of harvesting your own foodstuff, save you money and added health benefits making your five a day a walk in the park. You might even start replacing that takeaway pizza with home-grown veg packed with vitamins and minerals.

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The Future of Agriculture is Indoors

The Future of Agriculture is Indoors [Infographic] | ecogreenlove

Created by Indoor Agriculture Conference team, foudn on Visua.ly

This infographic lists the reasons why farming’s future is indoors, and introduces some of the key players in the movement.

look deep into nature, you'll understand everything | ecogreenlove

What can I plant in April? [Infographic]

April is finally here and your garden soil is finally warming up! April is the best time to plant most of your vegetable seeds after your last frost. It’s still not too late to plant tomatoes and peppers from seeds as well. Check out this infographic to know which vegetables and herbs can be started in April.

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Homegrown plants for common cures

It is known knowledge that, herbs grown around the house can turn out to be cures for common ailments. Instead of wasting gas to go to the drug store every now and then, grow some of this around the house in pots and place them in sun windowsill’s herb garden. This can easily be bought from garden stores and planted in the pots.

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DIY Kokedama Hanging Plants

Kokedama is a traditional Japanese art form that basically has moss used as a container for a plant.

Originally Published on Bloomzine

Kokedama is a style of Japanese bonsai, where a plant’s root system is simply wrapped in sphagnum moss and bound with string, transforming it into a sculptural art form. Loosely translated, ‘koke’ means moss and ‘dama’ means ball. The original Japanese form of kokedama had miniature sculptured bonsai trees displayed on handmade pottery or pieces of driftwood. They encapsulate the Japanese aesthetic of Wabi-sabi, which can be explained as an appreciation of the imperfections of nature and the transience of natural beauty. Characteristics of Wabi-sabi include simplicity, warmth, earthy, irregular, rough, natural, acceptance and observation. Kokedama are created as a reflection of the Wabi-sabi principles.

Kokedama has since been adapted from its traditional bonsai to offer a new string garden approach, allowing one to use many different types of plants. String gardens take this tradition a step further by suspending these little green orbs in the air. They’re a great way to bring the outdoors to your home and are easy to care for. Plant choices can vary from orchids, grasses, ferns, houseplants, citrus trees, herbs, annuals, perennials or even bulbs. Kokadama can hang indoors and out, be placed in a bowl, or displayed on some other decorative object. Group together your Kokedama creations for an even more dramatic display.

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