The Most and Least eco-friendly shopping Bags [Infographic]

When doing the grocery we always tend to think is better to buy paper bags or carrying our own fabric reusable bag, right? Well, our friends from MyTree.tv shared these stats which show how even paper bags leave a big water footprint and reusable cotton bags may not be the best ecofriendly option either. Check the full article here and tell us what you think!

Paper vs. plastic bags: You’d think this fight would have been settled by now. But as Trace explains, for cities around the world, the fight is more complicated than you’d think.

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Eco-fashion [Infographic]

Brought to you by BlueGala

Many name brand companies are incorporating eco-fashion into their lines by producing their clothing using methods that create a minimal carbon footprint without the use of harmful or synthetic chemicals. From Adidas apparel made with bionic yard, a textile made from plastic debris in the sea, to Burberry’s sustainable cotton program in Peru—explore which brands are leading the way into the green garment movement by positively impacting the environment.

Eco-friendly clothing is categorized into two types, natural organic fibers and recycled fibers. Natural fibers include cotton, hemp, bamboo, and soy. Whereas recycled fibers can be made from natural recycled fibers, plastic, and wool. Explore these different fibers and the process used to produce each of them.

Guide to Protein Supplements [Infographic]

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Vegan Milk Substitutes [Infographic]

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“As the vegan diet becomes more popular, more people are looking for milk substitutes. In fact, many of the people I know who drink almond milk or enjoy substituting coconut milk into baking aren’t even vegans. They’re people with lactose intolerance or people who enjoy eating healthy real foods.

I always warn people when they try a milk replacement to keep in mind that they have different flavors than cow’s milk. It can be disconcerting to try something and assume its flavor and texture is going to mimic the milk you’ve been drinking for 20 years, but if you think of it as an entirely different drink, the first sip should be very enjoyable.

Because there are now so many options for nondairy milks, it can actually get pretty confusing. If you became a vegan in the 1980s or 1990s, your only option was really soy milk, with the occasional rice milk indulgence. Now there are many different brands for dozens of nut milks, bean milks, and even grain milks. “

– Cathleen Woods from vegan-nutritionista.com

What milk do you drink? Which one do you commonly use for baking?

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