High Protein Rich Foods [Infographic]

High Protein Rich Foods [Infographic] | ecogreenlovePublished by healthbeckon.com

“Do you feel hungry and tired all the time? Do short bursts of workout make you feel lethargic and exhausted? Then you might be suffering from protein deficiency. Protein is a macro nutrient composed of amino acids. It is the building block of life. Our body can produce several amino acids required for protein production, but there is a set of essential amino acids that can be obtained from animal and plant sources only. Protein helps to break down the amino acids that promote cell growth and repair. The excess protein consumed is converted into energy by the body. Several researches have also suggested that protein in the form of lean meat, beans, nuts and dairy food can promote weight loss and reduce the risk of heart diseases. It takes a long time to be digested by the body, keeping you full for a longer time.”

in Rich Foods

Continue reading for a detailed list with nutrition facts

eat good, feel good | ecogreenlove

Foods that Fight Stress [Infographic]

Foods that fight Stress | ecogreenlove

It’s easy to forget the importance of everything we put into our bodies. What we eat has a critical impact on our health and in turn, our ability to deal with stress.

The main takeaway from this article should be to eat the most nutrient-dense foods possible. Meaning, for every bite you put in your mouth be sure you are getting important macronutrients, vitamins and minerals.

Here are some foods (note this is just a brief list – there are many more!) that can help alleviate your stress.

Remember, if you are under chronic or severe stress, food is just one component. Adequate sleep, hydration and stress management are also important factor to address!

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Is Chewing Gum harmful to the Environment? [Infographic]

Brought to you by Custom Made

A Sticky Problem

Whether it’s being used as a mid-day breath refresher or on the playground to see who can blow the biggest bubble—chewing gum is a daily habit for many people. But what happens when you’re done chewing it? 80–90% of chewing gum is not disposed of properly and it’s the second most common form of litter after cigarette butts.

Chewing gum is made from polymers which are synthetic plastics that do not biodegrade. When it’s tossed on the sidewalk, there it sits until it’s removed which can be a costly, time consuming process. Littered gum can also make it’s way into the food chain. It has been found in fish where it can accumulate toxins over time. Sustainable chewing gums have been produced. These gums are natural, biodegradable substances. Cities are also implementing gum receptacles to cut down on waste. In a six month period these trash cans cut down on littered gum by 72%.

Next time you get ready to toss your gum, consider aiming for a trash can instead of the side walk.

Naturally boosting the Immune System via JuiceRecipes.com and @preventionmag

The substances responsible for green and purple color of broccoli, vitamin C, beta-carotene and other vitamins and minerals, particularly selenium, copper, zinc, phosphorus, etc., present in broccoli are really great immune-strengtheners. They protect you from numerous infections.

Carrots do wonders for boosting the immune system by increasing the production and performance of white blood cells; building resistant to various kinds of infections.

Asparagus is one of the richest sources of rutin (a natural substance found in plants) which together with vitamin C, can help to energize and protect the body from infections. Asparagus is also a source of iron, which boosts the immune system and prevents anaemia.

The anti-oxidant nutrients in pears are a great way to boost your immune system. Drink pear juice at the first sign of a cold.

Continue reading “Naturally boosting the Immune System via JuiceRecipes.com and @preventionmag”

How to choose sustainable fish

Cut through confusion over supermarket labels and follow our guide to buying the right sustainable fish species

Click on the image to go to the interactive guide on The Guardian Environment article