Who are the Pollinators? [Infographic]

“Although pollinators come in every shape and size, bees probably make the largest contribution to our daily lives. Bees pollinate more than 100 types of crops in the US—everything from almonds to zucchini. They’re also vital to the reproduction of clover and alfalfa, which feed grazing animals like cows and goats. But last winter was a bleak season for bees. According to the latest survey data, the average US beekeeper lost 45% of her colonies.”

Continue reading “Who are the Pollinators? [Infographic]”

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Food Waste [Video]

Award-winning author Tristram Stuart argues that food waste is a global scandal.
via AJ+

I stumbled upon this video and is never enough when we publish something about food waste. Here are some facts and numbers in a visual easy-to-read infographic way that show what is costing to the environment, here is a video with some story about food waste, a video showing “stellar examples of ugly fruit and veggies” from FB and yet another video as example of how food that has been trashed out can be perfectly edible and even help others who can’t afford to eat nice food from the supermarkets or in a nice restaurant without having to go to the junk cheap food place. Well, there is even a Food Waste Day with some tips you can do to avoid wastage. We have even posted about how to use up some leftovers.

Continue reading “Food Waste [Video]”

Why are GMOs Bad? [Video]

Why are GMOs bad? They aren’t. They just aren’t, not intrinsically, and certainly not for your health. We’ve been eating them for decades with no ill effects, which makes sense, because a genetically modified organism is simply an organism, like every other organism, produces hundreds of thousands of proteins, but one or two of them are proteins that were chosen specifically by humans.

Hosted by: Hank Green Continue reading “Why are GMOs Bad? [Video]”

Environmental Dates: World Day to Combat Desertification and Drought

Environmental Dates: World Day to Combat Desertification and Drought | ecogreenlove

The World Day to Combat Desertification (WDCD) is observed worldwide on 17 June every year. The focus this year is “attainment of food security for all through sustainable food systems.”

With the slogan, ‘No such thing as a free lunch. Invest in healthy soil’, the 2015 observance calls for

  1. A change in our land use practices through smart agriculture and adaptation to changing climate, especially in the dry fragile parts of the world where food shortages are becoming more and more severe
  2. Access to technology and land rights for small holder farmers who safeguard the environment and meet the food needs of millions of households, especially among the poorest households
  3. A balance in the land use for ecology and consumption, drawing on the best practices
  4. More investments in sustainable land practices so that sustainable food systems become the normal practice and
  5. More effective action on desertification whose effects on security, peace and stability are invisible yet real for the affected countries due especially to food and water scarcity and environmentally forced migration.

Source: United Nations Convention to Combat Desertification

Be Eco: Join the Green, Share the Love! | ecogreenlove

A Guide to Food Waste [Infographic]

A Guide to Food Waste [Infographic] | ecogreenlove

Brough to you by Fix.com

In 2010, around one-third of the food produced in the United States was not consumed, and ended up being wasted. That is a troubling statistic, and represents a food waste crisis that if left ignored will continue to burn holes in the pockets of families, and contribute to waste and the myriad problems it causes our planet.

One of the first things you can do to cut food waste in your home is to stop treating the “best-before,” “use-by,” and “sell-by” labels as gospel that determine when food must instantly been thrown out. These labels are used for shelving and inventory purposes in stores, and you should always trust your eyes and nose before you trust a number on a package. Consider using food rather than throwing it out, unless your senses tell you otherwise!

Make your meal plans and take stock of what you have in your fridge and pantry before you go shopping, and shop accordingly. Consider joining a CSA to take advantage of freshness, and buy your groceries a few times a week and when needed, rather than all at once.