Is Chewing Gum harmful to the Environment? [Infographic]

Brought to you by Custom Made

A Sticky Problem

Whether it’s being used as a mid-day breath refresher or on the playground to see who can blow the biggest bubble—chewing gum is a daily habit for many people. But what happens when you’re done chewing it? 80–90% of chewing gum is not disposed of properly and it’s the second most common form of litter after cigarette butts.

Chewing gum is made from polymers which are synthetic plastics that do not biodegrade. When it’s tossed on the sidewalk, there it sits until it’s removed which can be a costly, time consuming process. Littered gum can also make it’s way into the food chain. It has been found in fish where it can accumulate toxins over time. Sustainable chewing gums have been produced. These gums are natural, biodegradable substances. Cities are also implementing gum receptacles to cut down on waste. In a six month period these trash cans cut down on littered gum by 72%.

Next time you get ready to toss your gum, consider aiming for a trash can instead of the side walk.

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Everyday Herbs with Curing Abilities

Originally Published by Janardhana Hebbar on CureJoy.com

Coriander

  • Soothing sinus problems and headaches:
    Boil five tablespoons of coriander seeds in water and breathe in the steam. Wrap your head with a towel so that the steam does not disappear and maximum quantity of it enters your respiratory tract.
  • For treatment of colds and flu:
    Brown five tablespoons of coriander seeds in a frying pan; ensuring not to overcook them. Then simmer the seeds in five cups of water with five pieces of ginger root. Minimize the liquid to two cups, filter the concoction and drink after adding some pure honey.
  • For treatment of infection of the urinary tract:
    Boil five tablespoons of coriander seeds in five cups of water and minimize the quantity to two cups and drink after adding pure honey. Drink this blend daily for a period of seven days to relieve the fiery sensation while urinating.

  • Quick fix the blisters and sores of mouth due to the antiseptic properties found in coriander leaves
  • Increase the levels of good cholesterol in the blood and decrease the levels of bad cholesterol
  • Good for inflammatory diseases such as arthritis on account of the anti-inflammatory features present in coriander leaves
  • Agreeable for eyesight due to the presence of antioxidants
  • Favorable for diabetese patients because coriander leaves incite the release of insulin thereby reducing the levels of sugar in the blood
  • Benefits the nervous system and sharpens the memory
  • Excellent for digestive system
  • Countermeasure anemia due to the presence of high amounts of iron

Continue reading “Everyday Herbs with Curing Abilities”

3 Common Garden Planning Mistakes (and how to avoid them)


Originally from Grow Veg

When planning a vegetable garden it’s easy to ignore problems that can occur when plants are in the ground. In this video we look at 3 common mistakes gardeners make when planning their gardens and give simple solutions.

Making sure your plants are spaced correctly, using companion planting to defend against pests and sowing in batches every few weeks so you have backup options are all important. This video shows how to use the Garden Planner to insure that your crops have the best chance of producing a great harvest.

Continue reading “3 Common Garden Planning Mistakes (and how to avoid them)”

The Most Common Cooking Mistakes

Learn how to avoid these common mistakes for success every time.

Story by Ann Taylor Pittman, Tim Cebula, and Cooking Light Staff

You can learn from your mistakes, but it may result in ugly cakes, calorie overloads, and even singed arm hair (ouch!).  Learn from our cooking, nutrition, grilling, and baking mistakes instead! Every cook, being human, errs, bungles, botches, and screws up in the kitchen once in a while. If you have not “caramelized” fruit in salt rather than sugar, you have not suffered the most embarrassing mistake made by one of our editors. We did not have to look much farther than our staff―and their encounters with readers, friends, and relatives―to compile a list of common, avoidable culinary boo-boos.

The creative cook can often cook her way out of a kitchen error, but the smart cook aims to prevent such creativity from being necessary. Here are over 50 ways to be smarter every time.

1. You don’t taste as you go.

Photo: Oxmoor House

Result: The flavors or textures of an otherwise excellent dish are out of balance or unappealing.

For most cooks, tasting is automatic, but when it’s not, the price can be high. Recipes don’t always call for the “right” amount of seasoning, cooking times are estimates, and results vary depending on your ingredients, your stove, altitude…and a million other factors. Your palate is the control factor.

Think that experienced cooks don’t forget this most basic rule? Cooking Light Associate Food Editor Tim Cebula was sous chef in a notable restaurant when he served up “caramelized” pineapple that somehow refused to brown. Turns out Tim had coated the fruit in salt, not sugar. “That’s why it wouldn’t caramelize.”

2. You don’t read the entire recipe before you start cooking.

Photo: Oxmoor House

Result: Flavors are dull, entire steps or ingredients get left out.

Even the best-written recipes may not include all the headline information at the top. A wise cook approaches each recipe with a critical eye and reads the recipe well before it’s time to cook. Follow the pros’ habit of gathering your mise en place―that is, having all the ingredients gathered, prepped, and ready to go before you turn on the heat.

“Trust me,” says former Cooking Light Test Kitchen tester Mary Drennen Ankar, “you don’t want to be an hour away from dinner guests arriving when you get to the part of the recipe that says to marinate the brisket overnight or simmer for two hours.”

3. You make unwise substitutions in baking.

Photo: Romulo Yanes & Randy Mayor

Result: You wreck the underlying chemistry of the dish.

Substitutions are a particular temptation, and challenge, with healthy cooking. At Cooking Light it’s our job to substitute lower-fat ingredients―to change the cooking chemistry a bit while capturing the soul of a dish. When it comes to baking, this is as much science as art.

“I’ll get calls from readers about cakes turning out too dense or too gummy,” says Test Kitchen Director Vanessa Pruett. “After a little interrogation, I’ll get to the truth―that the reader used ALL applesauce instead of a mix of applesauce and oil or butter or went with sugar substitute in place of sugar.” Best practice: Follow the recipe, period.

Continue reading “The Most Common Cooking Mistakes”