Off-Gassing [Infographic]

Off-gassing [Infographic] | ecogreenlove
by Custom Made

What is Off-Gassing? 

Off-gassing (also known as out-gassing) refers to the release of airborne particulates or chemicals—dubbed volatile organic compounds (VOCs)—from common household products. Potential sources of off-gassing range from construction materials to carpeting, cabinetry, furniture, paint, and any number of household goods. Some of the most common chemicals off-gassed from household items include formaldehyde, benzene, ammonia, and toluene. While off-gassing can be easily identified by so-called “new car” and “new carpet” smells, it can also be odorless.

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Allergy Friendly Home [Infographic]

Allergy freindly home | ecogreenlove

Brought to you by NeoMam

Keeping your home free from allergy and asthma triggers is one of the most important steps in controlling allergy symptoms. AllergyCosmos put this infographic together to show you how you can create a healthier home for you and your family.

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Eco-fashion [Infographic]

Brought to you by BlueGala

Many name brand companies are incorporating eco-fashion into their lines by producing their clothing using methods that create a minimal carbon footprint without the use of harmful or synthetic chemicals. From Adidas apparel made with bionic yard, a textile made from plastic debris in the sea, to Burberry’s sustainable cotton program in Peru—explore which brands are leading the way into the green garment movement by positively impacting the environment.

Eco-friendly clothing is categorized into two types, natural organic fibers and recycled fibers. Natural fibers include cotton, hemp, bamboo, and soy. Whereas recycled fibers can be made from natural recycled fibers, plastic, and wool. Explore these different fibers and the process used to produce each of them.

Vegan Milk Substitutes [Infographic]

MilkSubstitutions_ecogreenlove

“As the vegan diet becomes more popular, more people are looking for milk substitutes. In fact, many of the people I know who drink almond milk or enjoy substituting coconut milk into baking aren’t even vegans. They’re people with lactose intolerance or people who enjoy eating healthy real foods.

I always warn people when they try a milk replacement to keep in mind that they have different flavors than cow’s milk. It can be disconcerting to try something and assume its flavor and texture is going to mimic the milk you’ve been drinking for 20 years, but if you think of it as an entirely different drink, the first sip should be very enjoyable.

Because there are now so many options for nondairy milks, it can actually get pretty confusing. If you became a vegan in the 1980s or 1990s, your only option was really soy milk, with the occasional rice milk indulgence. Now there are many different brands for dozens of nut milks, bean milks, and even grain milks. “

– Cathleen Woods from vegan-nutritionista.com

What milk do you drink? Which one do you commonly use for baking?

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Cost-Efficient Ways to make your Home more Eco-Friendly [Infographic]

Originally Published on Huffington Post

Let’s face it: Reducing your home’s negative impact on the planet will likely require a huge amount of work.

But solar panels and temperature-regulating walls aren’t the only ways to help your household adopt more eco-friendly practices. There are a ton of easy — and fun — ways to conserve energy.

Luckily for us, UK-based magazine Good To Be Home has some clever ideas on other ways to do it.