Calories burned with Home Maintenance [Infographic]

burn-fat-with-home-maintenanceBought to you by YourGreenPal.com

 

Facts about Fruit Drinks [Infographic]

Found on How Stuff Works and originally published on HealthScience.net
as Soda’s Evil Twin: The Dangers of “Fruit Drinks”

According to info gathered by HealthScience.net, fruit drinks are not only not “healthy” but they are in many cases actually worse for you than soft drinks and sodas. Higher in sugar and much higher in calories. And even though some (but not all) contain real fruit juice, they are probably responsible for more expanding waistlines than those donuts you gave up eating during the morning sales briefing. (Considering an 8-ounce serving of Snapple Apple has more sugar than 2 and a half Krispy Kreme glazed donuts, you were probably off reaching for the box rather than the bottle.)

— ERIC ROGELL on Discovery.com

Health Tips that really work [Infographic]

tipsthatwork_ecogreenlove

Be Eco: Join the Green and Share the Love

Benefits of Matcha [Infographics]

via Visual.ly

Matcha (抹茶, pronounced [mat.tɕa]) is finely milled or fine powder green tea. The Japanese tea ceremony centers on the preparation, serving, and drinking of matcha. In modern times, matcha has also come to be used to flavour and dye foods such as mochi and soba noodles, green tea ice cream and a variety of wagashi (Japanese confectionery). Matcha is a fine-ground, powdered, high-quality green tea and not the same as konacha.

Blends of matcha are given poetic names called chamei (“tea names”) either by the producing plantation, shop or creator of the blend, or by the grand master of a particular tea tradition. When a blend is named by the grand master of a tea ceremony lineage, it becomes known as the master’s konomi, or favoured blend.

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The Best regimen for College Fitness [Infographic]

Starting out at college is a time of excitement, anticipation, and oftentimes, extreme nervousness. There are a whole host of prospects that can leave any freshman filled with anxiety, from making friends to maintaining good grades to knowing which classes to take. One of the biggest sources of anxiety for students, however, is unrelated to academics: A large percentage of students greatly fear the famous and dreaded freshman 15. The truth is, this isn’t an irrational fear: Most college students will gain between 15 and 25 pounds by the end of their sophomore year. One of the main causes of the freshman 15? Lack of exercise: Not only do the majority of college students not get the recommended amount of exercise, one in three just don’t exercise at all. To be fair, finding time for exercise in the midst of busy college life can be challenging, but there are some great ways that that particular hurdle can be side-stepped. Today’s infographic takes a look at the best ways for college students to stay fit even in the middle of a dorm room. From cardio to strength training to flexibility, there’s a myriad of ways in which even the biggest of couch potatoes can beat the freshman 15.

Originally Published on TheBestColleges.org