Guide to Fresh Juicing [Infographic]

Originally published by nutriprojuicer.com

The fresh juice frenzy is taking over fridges – According to Google; interest about juicers reached an all-time high in January 2013. Millions have embraced this food-culture phenomenon, enjoying a multitude of health benefits.

However, as this trend evolves it is important to be aware of which types of juice yield the most nutritional value. Did you know that currently 98% of the juices sold in the U.S. are pasteurized? Pasteurization uses a cooking process that kills bacteria to increase shelf life, but also destroys the natural enzymes, minerals, and essential nutrients contained in fresh juice.

Reaping the benefits of juicing through the use of fresh fruits and vegetables is more important than ever and is a tasty, easy way to meet your fruit and vegetable requirement. To improve your health – research has found that drinking fresh pressed juices can improve sleep, increase energy, decrease stress, and even lead to a longer life.

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Foods that Fight Stress [Infographic]

Foods that fight Stress | ecogreenlove

It’s easy to forget the importance of everything we put into our bodies. What we eat has a critical impact on our health and in turn, our ability to deal with stress.

The main takeaway from this article should be to eat the most nutrient-dense foods possible. Meaning, for every bite you put in your mouth be sure you are getting important macronutrients, vitamins and minerals.

Here are some foods (note this is just a brief list – there are many more!) that can help alleviate your stress.

Remember, if you are under chronic or severe stress, food is just one component. Adequate sleep, hydration and stress management are also important factor to address!

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Benefits of Reading and How to Read in the Mobile Era [Infographics]

IMG from The Wall Street Journal

Slow reading advocates seek a return to the focused reading habits of years gone by, before Google, smartphones and social media started fracturing our time and attention spans. Many of its advocates say they embraced the concept after realizing they couldn’t make it through a book anymore. The benefits of reading from an early age through late adulthood have been documented by researchers. A study of 300 elderly people published by the journal Neurology last year showed that regular engagement in mentally challenging activities, including reading, slowed rates of memory loss in participants’ later years. Reading habits have declined in recent years. In a survey this year, about 76% of Americans 18 and older said they read at least one book in the past year, down from 79% in 2011, according to the Pew Research Center.

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Health Secrets from Around the Globe

Photo: Dan Saelinger

By Dr. Mehmet Oz on Oprah.com

From the Japanese to the Russians, the Greeks to the Kuna Indians of Panama, every culture has its own secrets to better health and longer life. These traditional remedies and practices—like drinking a calming herbal tea or cooking with a particular spice—might seem inconsequential, but researchers are discovering that these little things can make a world of difference. Try importing these six habits, all worth bringing home.

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Why gardening is good for your health

By Anne Harding, Health.com

Gillian Aldrich started growing vegetables in her backyard three years ago, and she’s now working on planting a bed of hydrangeas, butterfly bushes, rose campion, and—her favorite—pale-pink hardy geraniums along one side of her property.

As she digs in the garden, her 8-year-old daughter and 3-year-old son often play around her, sometimes taking a break to dig for worms or pick strawberries. Instead of just watching them, Aldrich is playing, too—”my kind of play,” she says.

“When you sit at a desk all day, there’s something about literally putting your hands in the dirt, digging and actually creating something that’s really beautiful,” says Aldrich, 42, a magazine editor in Maplewood, N.J. “There’s something about just being out there that feels kind of elemental.”

Aldrich isn’t the only one who feels this way. Many gardeners view their hobby as the perfect antidote to the modern world, a way of reclaiming some of the intangible things we’ve lost in our busy, dirt-free lives.

The sensory experience of gardening “allows people to connect to this primal state,” says James Jiler, the founder and executive director of Urban GreenWorks, a Miami-based nonprofit that provides environmental services and programs for low-income neighborhoods. “A lot of people [understand] that experience. They may not be able to put it into words, but they understand what’s happening.”

Working in the garden has other, less spiritual rewards. In addition to being a source of fresh, healthy produce, gardening can ease stress, keep you limber, and even improve your mood.

Here are just a few of the ways gardening can benefit your physical and mental health, and how you can start harvesting those benefits for you and your family.

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